Bulletin for Sunday, November 29, 2009

FIRST SUNDAY OF ADVENT

Mass Schedule and Calendar.
(all of the following are at St. Elizabeth Ann Seton, Mass in the Day Chapel–unless otherwise noted)

Sunday, 12-6, 3:00 p.m. Mass.
Sunday, 12-13, 3:00 p.m. Gaudete Sunday Mass. Followed by social hour pitch-in dinner. Bring a light dish such as cookies, chips/dips, cheese/crackers, or finger sandwiches. You, family and friends are welcome whether or not you bring food!
Friday, 12-25, 7:00 a.m. Christmas Mass.
Friday, 1-1-2010, 7:00 p.m. Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God (Obligation).
Sunday, 1-31-2010, 3:00 p.m. Feast of St. John Bosco. Solemn High Mass, pitch-in dinner and guest speaker Father Robert Fromageot, FSSP.

Announcements

Thanks again to those who participated in the Thanksgiving Canned Food Drive.

Results of the Una Voce Carmel Board Meeting. We have an excellent start on developing a comprehensive organization that will guide our community into the future. Eleven different departments have been established with several more in the works.

The Speaker Series is back! With the establishment of the above described organization, we are pleased to give you a peek at just some of the Speaker Series events for 2010:

  • January. Sunday, 1-31, Feast of St. John Bosco. Pitch-in dinner and Solmen High Mass with speaker Father Robert Fromageot, FSSP (as recently seen on EWTN).
  • March. Lenten Recollection with North Central Indiana’s very own native hometown boy, Father Roberto Cano, FSSP. Solemn High Mass to follow, followed by pitch-in dinner.
  • May. Father Gregory Pendergraft, FSSP, execvutive Director of Development for the Priestly Society of St. Peter (FSSP) in North America. Solemn High Mass followed by pitch-in dinner.
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Rule of St. Benedict no. 53

Thought for the day:

“All guests who present themselves are to be welcomed as Christ, for he himself will say: I was a stranger and you welcomed me,” (Mt. 25:35).

NY TIMES on Latin Mass

The New York Times

 


November 29, 2009
Op-Ed Contributor

Latin Mass Appeal

By KENNETH J. WOLFE

(Washington, DC) WALKING into church 40 years ago on this first Sunday of Advent, many Roman Catholics might have wondered where they were. The priest not only spoke English rather than Latin, but he faced the congregation instead of the tabernacle; laymen took on duties previously reserved for priests; folk music filled the air. The great changes of Vatican II had hit home.

All this was a radical break from the traditional Latin Mass, codified in the 16th century at the Council of Trent. For centuries, that Mass served as a structured sacrifice with directives, called “rubrics,” that were not optional. This is how it is done, said the book. As recently as 1947, Pope Pius XII had issued an encyclical on liturgy that scoffed at modernization; he said that the idea of changes to the traditional Latin Mass “pained” him “grievously.”

Paradoxically, however, it was Pius himself who was largely responsible for the momentous changes of 1969. It was he who appointed the chief architect of the new Mass, Annibale Bugnini, to the Vatican’s liturgical commission in 1948.

Bugnini was born in 1912 and ordained a Vincentian priest in 1936. Though Bugnini had barely a decade of parish work, Pius XII made him secretary to the Commission for Liturgical Reform. In the 1950s, Bugnini led a major revision of the liturgies of Holy Week. As a result, on Good Friday of 1955, congregations for the first time joined the priest in reciting the Pater Noster, and the priest faced the congregation for some of the liturgy.

The next pope, John XXIII, named Bugnini secretary to the Preparatory Commission for the Liturgy of Vatican II, in which position he worked with Catholic clergymen and, surprisingly, some Protestant ministers on liturgical reforms. In 1962 he wrote what would eventually become the Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy, the document that gave the form of the new Mass.

Many of Bugnini’s reforms were aimed at appeasing non-Catholics, and changes emulating Protestant services were made, including placing altars to face the people instead of a sacrifice toward the liturgical east. As he put it, “We must strip from our … Catholic liturgy everything which can be the shadow of a stumbling block for our separated brethren, that is, for the Protestants.” (Paradoxically, the Anglicans who will join the Catholic Church as a result of the current pope’s outreach will use a liturgy that often features the priest facing in the same direction as the congregation. )

How was Bugnini able to make such sweeping changes? In part because none of the popes he served were liturgists. Bugnini changed so many things that John’s successor, Paul VI, sometimes did not know the latest directives. The pope once questioned the vestments set out for him by his staff, saying they were the wrong color, only to be told he had eliminated the week-long celebration of Pentecost and could not wear the corresponding red garments for Mass. The pope’s master of ceremonies then witnessed Paul VI break down in tears.

Bugnini fell from grace in the 1970s. Rumors spread in the Italian press that he was a Freemason, which if true would have merited excommunication. The Vatican never denied the claims, and in 1976 Bugnini, by then an archbishop, was exiled to a ceremonial post in Iran. He died, largely forgotten, in 1982.

But his legacy lived on. Pope John Paul II continued the liberalizations of Mass, allowing females to serve in place of altar boys and to permit unordained men and women to distribute communion in the hands of standing recipients. Even conservative organizations like Opus Dei adopted the liberal liturgical reforms.

But Bugnini may have finally met his match in Benedict XVI, a noted liturgist himself who is no fan of the past 40 years of change. Chanting Latin, wearing antique vestments and distributing communion only on the tongues (rather than into the hands) of kneeling Catholics, Benedict has slowly reversed the innovations of his predecessors. And the Latin Mass is back, at least on a limited basis, in places like Arlington, Va., where one in five parishes offer the old liturgy.

Benedict understands that his younger priests and seminarians — most born after Vatican II — are helping lead a counterrevolution. They value the beauty of the solemn high Mass and its accompanying chant, incense and ceremony. Priests in cassocks and sisters in habits are again common; traditionalist societies like the Institute of Christ the King are expanding.

At the beginning of this decade, Benedict (then Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger) wrote: “The turning of the priest toward the people has turned the community into a self-enclosed circle. In its outward form, it no longer opens out on what lies ahead and above, but is closed in on itself.” He was right: 40 years of the new Mass have brought chaos and banality into the most visible and outward sign of the church. Benedict XVI wants a return to order and meaning. So, it seems, does the next generation of Catholics.

Kenneth J. Wolfe writes frequently for traditionalist Roman Catholic publications.

Thanksgiving Day Proclamation of 1789

by President George Washington

Whereas it is the duty of all Nations to acknowledge the providence of Almighty God, to obey His will, to be grateful for His benefits, and humbly to implore His protection and favor, and Whereas both Houses of Congress have by their joint committee requested me to recommend to the People of the United States a day of public thanks giving and prayer to be observed by acknowledging with grateful hearts the many single favors of Almighty God, especially by affording them an opportunity peaceably to establish a form of government for their safety and happiness.

Now therefore I do recommend and assign Thursday the 26th day of November next to be devoted by the People of these States to the Service of that great and glorious Being, who is the beneficent Author of all the good that was, that is, or that will be. That we may then all unite in rendering unto Him our sincere and humble thanks, for His kind care and protection of the People of this country previous to their becoming a Nation, for the single and manifold mercies, and the favorable interpositions of His providence, which we experienced in the course and conclusion of the late war, for the great degree of tranquility, union, and plenty, which we have since enjoyed, for the peaceable and rational manner in which we have been enabled to establish constitutions of government for our safety and happiness, and particularly the national One now lately instituted, of the civil and religious liberty with which we are blessed, and the means we have to acquiring and diffusing useful knowledge and in general for all the great and various favors which He hath been pleased to confer upon us.

And also that we may then unite in most humble offering our prayers and supplications to the Great Lord and Ruler of Nations and beseech Him to pardon our national and other transgressions, to enable us all, whether in public or private stations, to perform our several and relative duties properly and punctually, to render our national government a blessing to all people, by constantly being a government of wise, just and constitutional laws, discreetly and faithfully executed and obeyed, to protect and guide all Sovereigns and nations (especially such as have shown kindness unto us) and to bless them with good government, peace and concord. To promote the knowledge and practice of true religion and virtue, and the increase of science among them and us, and generally to grant unto all Mankind such a degree of temporal prosperity as He alone know to be best.

Please Vote “Yes” Here!

By Dan Gilgoff, God & Country US NEWS AND WORLD REPORT

Rhode Island Rep. Patrick Kennedy’s bishop asked him to forgo communion because of his support for abortion rights. The vast majority of American Roman Catholic bishops have declined to make such requests, but a growing number are making headlines for doing so.

What do you think of the practice?

There are a lot of in-between positions here, so explain your vote here by clicking on the link below and vote, yes!

http://www.usnews.com/blogs/god-and-country/2009/11/23/should-bishops-ask-officials-to-skip-communion-over-abortion.html

Rowan Returns

H.H. Pope Benedict XVI and H.G. Rowan Williams, Archbishop of Canterbury on Saturday, November 21, 2009 (Reuters)

WHISPER IN THE LOGGIA:  A month after the Holy See announced its historic initiative to accommodate groups of Anglicans seeking inclusion into the Roman fold, and a fortnight since the Apostolic Constitution paving the way to “personal ordinariates” was released, this morning the Pope received the archbishop of Canterbury, Dr Rowan Williams, for the duo’s third private meeting.

Here below, the joint release on the session:

This morning His Holiness Pope Benedict XVI received in private audience His Grace Rowan Williams, Archbishop of Canterbury.

In the course of the cordial discussions attention turned to the challenges facing all Christian communities at the beginning of this millennium, and to the need to promote forms of collaboration and shared witness in facing these challenges.

The discussions also focused on recent events affecting relations between the Catholic Church and the Anglican Communion, reiterating the shared will to continue and to consolidate the ecumenical relationship between Catholics and Anglicans, and recalling how, over coming days, the commission entrusted with preparing the third phase of international theological dialogue between the parties (ARCIC [the Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission]) is due to meet.

In an Audience Eve conference at Rome’s Pontifical Gregorian University, Williams raised some eyebrows by terming the state of ecumenism a “glass half full,” recent developments included.

Bishop Rhoades to replace Bishop D’Arcy at Notre Dame’s diocese

carmelites

South Bend, Ind., Nov 15, 2009 / 10:19 am (CNA).- Pope Benedict XVI appointed on Saturday Bishop of Harrisburg, Penn. Kevin C. Rhoades as the ninth Bishop of Fort Wayne-South Bend, the diocese that includes Notre Dame University.

Bishop Rhoades will replace Bishop John D’Arcy, who until Saturday was the oldest bishop governing a diocese in the US. He was prominent early this year for his strong stance against President Obama’s Notre Dame invitation.

Bishop D’Arcy strongly criticized Notre Dame University President John Jenkins, C.S.C. for honoring the President despite his pro-abortion stance, and made good on his pledge to stay away from the graduation. He decided at the last minute to attend what he called a “prayerful” graduation alternative organized on the campus by ND Response, a student-led pro-life group.

Bishop Rhoades was born November 26, 1957, in Mahanoy City, Penn. and graduated from Lebanon Catholic High School in 1975.

He enrolled at Mount Saint Mary’s College (now University) in Emmitsburg, Maryland in the fall of 1975 and studied there for two years. In 1977, he entered Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary in Overbrook, Penn., earning a bachelor’s degree in philosophy there in 1979. He did his theological studies at the North American College and the Pontifical Gregorian University, both in Rome, from 1979-1983. He also studied Spanish at the University of Salamanca in Spain during the summer of 1982.

He was ordained a priest of the Harrisburg Diocese on July 9, 1983. Besides being a parochial vicar at Saint Patrick Parish in York, he ministered in the Spanish-speaking apostolates at Cristo Salvador Parish in York and Cristo Rey Mission in Bendersville.

In 1985 he returned to the Gregorian University in Rome, where he earned advanced degrees in dogmatic theology and canon law.

In 1988, he returned to the Harrisburg Diocese to serve as assistant chancellor under then-Bishop Keeler. During this time, he also ministered as the director of the Spanish apostolate.

In 1995 he accepted a full-time faculty position with Mount Saint Mary’s Seminary.

In March 1997, he was named rector of the Seminary, an office he held until his appointment by Pope John Paul II as Bishop of the Diocese of Harrisburg on October 14, 2004.

Bishop Rhoades served until today as President of the Pennsylvania Catholic Conference and as Co-chair of the Pennsylvania Conference on Interchurch Cooperation.

“Naturally, it will not be easy for me to bid farewell to my family and friends, my brother priests and the faithful of the Harrisburg diocese,” Bishop Rhoades said in a statement.  “My greatest joys as Bishop have been in being with the people, teaching the faith, and celebrating the sacraments.”

He noted his new diocese differs from the Diocese of Harrisburg in that it has five Catholic colleges and universities “including the internationally renowned University of Notre Dame.”

“I ask for the people’s prayers that I might be a true shepherd after the heart of Christ,” he added.

Bishop Rhoades will be installed as Bishop D’Arcy’s successor on January 13, 2010.