Explanation on Religious Freedom from Vatican II

Please listen to the answer from Colin Donovan on his popular EWTN call-in show OPEN LINE, heard every weekday at 2pm on 89.1FM. Click below but be patient since it takes a minute to download the mp3 file.

Streaming below
 

mp3 download here: magisteriumtothemagisterium

 Colin B. Donovan, STL
Colin Donovan is Vice President for Theology at EWTN. A layman, he has the Licentiate in Sacred Theology, with a specialization in moral theology, from the Pontifical University of St. Thomas Aquinas (Angelicum) in Rome, where he wrote on the Donation of the Spouses in Marriage. He earned the BTh from the Seminary of Christ the King in Mission, BC, Canada and the BA in Biological Science from Northwestern University, Evanston, IL. Prior to coming to EWTN in 1995, he taught Theology at Aquinas College in Nashville.

Ask a Theologian: Will the Council be Repealed?

Well, the answer is a resounding NO. Please listen to the answer from Colin Donovan on his popular EWTN call-in show OPEN LINE, heard every weekday at 2pm on 89.1FM. Click below but be patient since it takes a minute to download the mp3 file.

(This is a streaming link or choose download below)

 

mp3 download here: CollinDonvanAnswers

 Colin B. Donovan, STL
Colin Donovan is Vice President for Theology at EWTN. A layman, he has the Licentiate in Sacred Theology, with a specialization in moral theology, from the Pontifical University of St. Thomas Aquinas (Angelicum) in Rome, where he wrote on the Donation of the Spouses in Marriage. He earned the BTh from the Seminary of Christ the King in Mission, BC, Canada and the BA in Biological Science from Northwestern University, Evanston, IL. Prior to coming to EWTN in 1995, he taught Theology at Aquinas College in Nashville.

Father Jonathan Romanowski, FSSP to offer Solemn High Mass in Carmel, IN

CARMEL, INDIANA  June 19,  2008 – The first Solemn High Mass in forty years within the Carmel Deanery will be held at St. Elizabeth Ann Seton on Sunday, June 22nd at 2:00 PM.  A potluck will follow the Mass. Please bring a dish and your appetite.

 

This ancient Mass of St. Gregory the Great also called the Gregorian Mass, Traditional Latin Mass or Tridentine Mass will be offered by the newly ordained Father Jonathan Romanowski, FSSP.  Father Romanowski was ordained on May 30th by Darío Cardinal Castrillón Hoyos who is the president of the Pontifical Commission Ecclesia Dei.  Father Romanowski is a fine product of Our Lady of Guadalupe in Denton, Nebraska.

St. Gregory the Great (540 AD – 604 AD) is also known as Gregory the Dialogist (Gregorios Dialogos) and Saint Pope Gregory in Eastern Orthodoxy because of the Dialogues he wrote.  He was the first of the Popes from a monastic background. Gregory is a Doctor of the Church and one of the four great Latin Fathers of the Church (the others being Ambrose, Augustine, and Jerome).  Of all popes, Gregory I had the most influence on the early medieval church.

                                         His Excellency, Bishop William Leo Higi

Under the continuing support of His Excellency, WIlliam Leo Higi, the Carmel Deanery lead by Father Theodore Rothrock and Una Voce Carmel has developed St. Elizabeth Ann Seton in Carmel, Indiana to be the focal point for the Traditional Latin Masses in the deanery.   The Carmel Deanery has ten parishes in two counties which are the northern suburbs of Indianapolis, Indiana.  The deanery is comprised of 13,800 families.

 Father Christopher Roberts

The diocese through the deanery has supported our very own Father Christopher Roberts in his endeavor to master the Traditional Latin Mass.  Father Roberts attended the workshop at St. John Cantius in May and offered his first Mass at St. Ellizabeth Ann Seton in the deanery on June 1st.  

Father Roberts is offering semi-public Masses at Our Lady of Mt Carmel in Carmel, Indiana:

  • Friday, June 20th at 7am
  • Monday, June 23rd at 7am
  • Tuesday, June 24 at 7am
  • Tuesday, July 1 at 7am.

 Father Theodore Rothrock

Father Rothrock has provided three unique means of Catholic worship at the chapel in St. Elizabeth Ann Seton parish for the entire Carmel Deanery.  On every weekday, one can attend the Mass as per the 1970 Roman Missal.  Since May, 2005, on some Saturday late afternnons, one can attend the Divine Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom made possible by Father Sid Sidor from the Byzantine Rite parish, St. Athanasius in Indianapolis.  And on every Sunday late afternoon, one can assist Mass as per the 1962 Roman Missal offered by priests from The Institute of Christ the King, The Priestly Fraternity of St. Peter and Father Roberts from the deanery.     

Latin Mass to return to England and Wales

By Damian Thompson

The traditional Latin Mass – effectively banned by Rome for 40 years – is to be reintroduced into every Roman Catholic parish in England and Wales, the senior Vatican cardinal in charge of Latin liturgy said at a press conference in London today.

In addition, all seminaries will be required to teach trainee priests how to say the old Mass so that they can celebrate it in all parishes.

Catholic congregations throughout the world will receive special instruction on how to appreciate the old services, formerly known as the Tridentine Rite.

Yesterday’s announcement by the senior Vatican cardinal in charge of Latin liturgy, Cardinal Dario Castrillon Hoyos, speaking on behalf of Pope Benedict XVI, will horrify Catholic liberals, including many bishops of England and Wales.

The Pope upset the liberals last year when he issued a decree removing their power to block the celebration of the old Mass. Yesterday’s move demonstrates that the Vatican intends to go much further in promoting the ancient liturgy.

Asked whether the Latin Mass would be celebrated in many ordinary parishes in future, Cardinal Castrillon said: “Not many parishes – all parishes. The Holy Father is offering this not only for the few groups who demand it, but so that everybody knows this way of celebrating the Eucharist.”

The Cardinal, who heads the Pontifical Commission Ecclesia Dei, made his comments as he was preparing to celebrate a traditional Latin Mass at Westminster Cathedral yesterday, the first time a cardinal has done so there for 40 years.

In the traditional rite, the priest faces in the same direction as the people and reads the main prayer of the Mass in Latin, in a voice so low as to be virtually silent. By contrast, in the new rite the priest faces the people and speaks audibly in the local language.

Cardinal Castrillon said that the reverent silence of the traditional rite was one of the “treasures” that Catholics would rediscover, and young worshippers would encounter for the first time.

Pope Benedict will reintroduce the old rite – which will be known as the “Gregorian Rite” – even where the congregation has not asked for it. “People don’t know about it, and therefore they don’t ask for it,” the Cardinal explained.

The revised Mass, adopted in 1970 after the Second Vatican Council, had given rise to “many, many, many abuses”, the Cardinal said. He added: “The experience of the last 40 years has not always been so good. Many people have lost their sense of adoration for God, and these abuses mean that many children do not know how to be in the presence of God.”

However, the new rite will not disappear; the Pope wishes to see the two forms of Mass existing side by side.

Such sweeping liturgical changes are certain to cause intense controversy. At a press conference, a journalist from the liberal Tablet magazine, which is close to the English bishops, told the Cardinal that the new liturgical changes amounted to “going backwards”.

Following last year’s papal decree, liberal bishops in England and America have attempted to limit the takeup of the old Mass by arguing that the rules say it should only be reintroduced when a “stable group” of the faithful request it. But Cardinal Castrillon said that a stable group could consist of as few as three people, and they need not come from the same parish.

The changes will take a few years to implement fully, he added, just as the Second Vatican Council had taken a long time to absorb. He insisted that the widespread reintroduction of the old Mass did not contradict the teachings of the Council.

First Solemn High Mass Sunday, June 22nd at 2 PM in Carmel, Indiana

CARMEL, INDIANA  June 11, 2008 – The first Solemn High Mass in forty years within the Carmel Deanery will be held at St. Elizabeth Ann Seton on Sunday, June 22nd at 2:00 PM.  A potluck will follow the Mass. Please bring a dish and your appetite.

 

This ancient Mass of St. Gregory the Great also called the Traditional Latin Mass or Tridentine Mass will be offered by the newly ordained Father Jonathan Romanowski, FSSP.  Father Romanowski was ordained on May 30th by Darío Cardinal Castrillón Hoyos who is the president of the Pontifical Commission Ecclesia Dei.  Father Romanowski is a fine product of Our Lady of Guadalupe in Denton, Nebraska.

St. Gregory the Great (540 AD – 604 AD) is also known as Gregory the Dialogist (Gregorios Dialogos) and Saint Pope Gregory in Eastern Orthodoxy because of the Dialogues he wrote.  He was the first of the Popes from a monastic background. Gregory is a Doctor of the Church and one of the four great Latin Fathers of the Church (the others being Ambrose, Augustine, and Jerome).  Of all popes, Gregory I had the most influence on the early medieval church.

                                         His Excellency, Bishop William Leo Higi

Under the continuing support of His Excellency, WIlliam Leo Higi, the Carmel Deanery lead by Father Theodore Rothrock has developed St. Elizabeth Ann Seton in Carmel, Indiana to be the focal point for the Traditional Latin Masses in the deanery.   The Carmel Deanery has ten parishes in two counties which are the northern suburbs of Indianapolis, Indiana.  The deanery is comprised of 13,800 families.

 Father Christopher Roberts

The deanery has supported their very own Father Christopher Roberts in his endeavor to learn the Traditional Latin Mass.  Father Roberts attended the workshop at St. John Cantius in May and offered his first Mass at St. Ellizabeth Ann Seton in the deanery on June 1st.  Father Rothrock has recently said that there will be other priests in the deanery who will follow.  

 Father Theodore Rothrock

Father Rothrock has provided three unique means of Catholic worship at the chapel in St. Elizabeth Ann Seton parish for the entire Carmel Deanery.  On every weekday, one can attend the Mass as per the 1970 Roman Missal.  Since May, 2005, on every Saturday evening, one can attend the Divine Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom made possible by Father Sid Sidor from the Byzantine Rite parish, St. Athanasius in Indianapolis.  And on every Sunday late afternoon, one can assist Mass as per the 1962 Roman Missal offered by priests from The Institute of Christ the King, The Priestly Fraternity of St. Peter and Father Roberts from the deanery.     

Archeologists find oldest Catholic church

Amman, June 9 (DPA) Archaeologists in Jordan have discovered what they claimed to be the ‘oldest Catholic church in world’ at Rihab, 40 km north-east of Amman, the Jordan Times reported Monday.

‘We have uncovered what we believe to be the oldest Catholic church in the world, dating from 33AD to 70AD,’ Abdul Qader Hassan, head of the Rihab Centre for Archaeological Studies told the paper.

The discovery lying underneath Saint Georgeous Church in Rihab is ‘amazing, because we have evidence to believe this church sheltered the early Christians, the 70 disciples of Jesus Christ’, he said.

The early Christians, described in the mosaic inscription on the floor of St Georgeous as ‘the 70 beloved by God and Divine,’ are said to have fled from Jerusalem during the persecution of Christians to the northern part of Jordan, particularly to Rihab, he added.

Citing historical sources, Hassan said the 70 lived and practised their rituals in secrecy in this underground church.

‘We believe that they did not leave the cave and lived until the Christian religion was embraced by Roman rulers,’ he added. ‘It was then St Georgeous Church was built,’ he said.

The findings in the graveyard near the cave offer valuable clues, according to the Jordanian archaeological expert.

‘We found pottery items that date back from the 3rd to 7th century. The findings show that the first Christians and their offspring continued living in the area until the late Roman rule,’ he said.

‘Going down a few steps into the cave, one would see a circle shape area, believed to be the apse, and several stone seats for the ecclesiastics,’ he added.

Archimandrite Nektarious, Bishop Deputy of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese, described the discovery of the cave as an ‘important milestone for Christians all around the world’.

‘The only other cave in the world similar in shape and purpose is in Thessalonica, Greece,’ Jordan Times quoted the bishop as saying.

Officials at the Jordanian Ministry of Tourism said they planned to capitalise on the discovery to further promote the area to become a major tourist attraction in the near future.

 

 

Pope Benedict to meet President Bush in medieval tower

Vatican City, Jun 10, 2008 / 01:40 am (CNA).- Pope Benedict XVI will meet with President George W. Bush in a restored medieval tower on Friday. Vatican spokesman Federico Lombardi said the unusual venue was chosen to repay Bush for “the cordiality of the meeting at the White House” during the Pope’s U.S. visit in April.

Although the Pope usually receives heads of state in his private study in the Apostolic Palace, overlooking St. Peter’s Square, the upcoming meeting will take place on the upper deck of St. John’s tower, a round structure on a hilltop inside the Vatican gardens.

The tower, which Pope John XXIII restored the tower as a place he could work in peace, is sometimes used as a residence for important guests.

After their private talks, President Bush and Pope Benedict will walk in the gardens to see a statue of the Madonna.

President Bush will be in Rome from Wednesday until Friday. He will also tour Slovenia, Germany, Italy, France and Britain.