Confirmation in the Traditional Rite at Columbus, Ohio

 

Father Kevin Lutz on the left

Father Kevin Lutz on the left

By Bill Heyer, Una Voce Columbus

 

Monsignor Stephan Moloney

Monsignor Stephan Moloney

Una Voce Columbus is pleased to announce the first extraordinary form Confirmations for the Diocese of Columbus, OH in more than 30 years.  Holy Family Church will host the Chancellor of the Diocese, Msgr. Maloney, who will confer the sacrament in the name of Bishop Campbell who is recovering from surgery.

Father Kevin Lutz, pastor of Holy Family, at the urging of many parents, sought approval from the Diocese and was well-received by the Chancellor.  Interestingly, all of the youth wanted the extraordinary form- students from both our English and Latin communities at Holy Family…

Confirmations are this Wednesday, April 29th; a huge step forward for our community. Pray for these young Miles Jesu.

Archbishop Burke Celebrates Pontifical Mass in the Usus Antiquior in Lourdes

H.E. Archbishop Raymond Burke

H.E. Archbishop Raymond Burke

Last Saturday, Feast of St. Marcus, Archbishop Raymond Burke, the Prefect of the Apostolic Signatura, pontificated in the Extraordinary Form in the Basilica of the Immaculate Conception at Lourdes in the context of the annual pilgrimage of the Institute of Christ the King Sovereign Priest (ICRSS). As the Spanish blog Benedicámus Dómino reports, afterwards the Archbishop gave a talk and a Q&A session, and on the Sunday the Superior of the ICRSS, Gilles Wach, celebrated Solemn Mass, again in the Basilica, at which Archbishop Burke assisted.

Read the entire article at NLM

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**UPDATE**Pope Benedict offers Mass Ad Orientum in 2008

UPDATE:  The Vatican announced that HH Benedict XVI will offer this Mass again (ad orientem) on Sunday, January 11th, Feast of the Baptism of Our Lord. The Pope will offer Mass in the Sistine Chapel at 10:00 a.m., followed by the Baptism of several children.
EWTN will broadcast live at 4am EDT with encore presentations at 12 pm EDT and 12 am (January 12th)

 Click here for EWTN schedule2008-01_papal-mass-ad-orientem

It was the will of the Eternal Father that one universal language be used along with, in comparison with, together with the language of the land. This universal language, Latin, befit and was chosen by the Eternal Father as a universal language for the universal Church, the Roman Catholic Church….” Our Lady of the Roses, April 10, 1976

Catholic World News 2008:

 

 

Pope Benedict XVI baptized 13 infants, the children of Vatican employees, in keeping with a Vatican tradition on the feast of the Baptism of Christ.

The Holy Father used the ad orientem posture, facing in the same direction as the congregation, using the magnificent altar of the Sistine Chapel rather than portable altar that had been set up in previous years. This provoked widespread comment, with many journalists reporting that the Pope had revived an old liturgical tradition. (In fact, the ad orientem posture was never abolished.)

Msgr. Guido Marini, the new master of ceremonies for papal liturgies, said that the traditional posture was used to emphasize the “beauty and harmony of this architectural masterpiece,” as it was originally designed for liturgical ceremonies. He noted in a public statement that in celebrating ad orientem, the Pope was not breaking with existing practice but “making use of a possibility contemplated by liturgical norms.” Still the Pontiff’s return to a traditional practice revived rumors that Pope Benedict will soon celebrate a public Mass using the “extraordinary form”– the traditional Latin Mass.

The Pope baptized 8 girls and 5 boys at the January 13 ceremony. (One of the boys was named John Paul) In his homily he reminded the parents and godparents that in Baptism the child enters “into a personal relationship with the Creator, and this lasts forever.”

“It is for this reason that Christian parents bring their children to the baptismal font as soon as possible,” the Holy Father continued; “knowing that the life they have communicated to them invokes a fullness, a salvation, that only God can give.” By having their children baptized promptly, he said, “the parents become God’s collaborators, transmitting to their children not only physical but also spiritual life.”

“Unfortunately,” the Pontiff continued, “man is capable of extinguishing this new life through sin.” For other animals, death means only the end of life, the Pope observed. But for humans “sin creates an abyss which risks swallowing us up forever.” Christ went into that abyss himself, he said, to give mankind the opportunity to escape it.

Later on Sunday, at his midday Angelus audience, Pope Benedict reflected on the Baptism of Christ, noting that the event marked the beginning of Christ’s public life. “By having Himself baptized by John together with sinners, Jesus began to take upon Himself the burden of sin of all humanity,” he said.

The Pope continued: “The whole of Christ’s mission may be summed up in this way: Baptism in the Holy Spirit to free us from the slavery of death and open us to heaven– in other words … to true and full life.”

Latin Mass to return to England and Wales

In addition, all seminaries will be required to teach trainee priests how to say the old Mass so that they can celebrate it in all parishes.

Catholic congregations throughout the world will receive special instruction on how to appreciate the old services, formerly known as the Tridentine Rite.

Yesterday’s announcement by the senior Vatican cardinal in charge of Latin liturgy, Cardinal Dario Castrillon Hoyos, speaking on behalf of Pope Benedict XVI, will horrify Catholic liberals, including many bishops of England and Wales.

The Pope upset the liberals last year when he issued a decree removing their power to block the celebration of the old Mass. Yesterday’s move demonstrates that the Vatican intends to go much further in promoting the ancient liturgy.

Asked whether the Latin Mass would be celebrated in many ordinary parishes in future, Cardinal Castrillon said: “Not many parishes – all parishes. The Holy Father is offering this not only for the few groups who demand it, but so that everybody knows this way of celebrating the Eucharist.”

The Cardinal, who heads the Pontifical Commission Ecclesia Dei, made his comments as he was preparing to celebrate a traditional Latin Mass at Westminster Cathedral yesterday, the first time a cardinal has done so there for 40 years.

In the traditional rite, the priest faces in the same direction as the people and reads the main prayer of the Mass in Latin, in a voice so low as to be virtually silent. By contrast, in the new rite the priest faces the people and speaks audibly in the local language.

Cardinal Castrillon said that the reverent silence of the traditional rite was one of the “treasures” that Catholics would rediscover, and young worshippers would encounter for the first time.

Pope Benedict will reintroduce the old rite – which will be known as the “Gregorian Rite” – even where the congregation has not asked for it. “People don’t know about it, and therefore they don’t ask for it,” the Cardinal explained.

The revised Mass, adopted in 1970 after the Second Vatican Council, had given rise to “many, many, many abuses”, the Cardinal said. He added: “The experience of the last 40 years has not always been so good. Many people have lost their sense of adoration for God, and these abuses mean that many children do not know how to be in the presence of God.”

However, the new rite will not disappear; the Pope wishes to see the two forms of Mass existing side by side.

Such sweeping liturgical changes are certain to cause intense controversy. At a press conference, a journalist from the liberal Tablet magazine, which is close to the English bishops, told the Cardinal that the new liturgical changes amounted to “going backwards”.

Following last year’s papal decree, liberal bishops in England and America have attempted to limit the takeup of the old Mass by arguing that the rules say it should only be reintroduced when a “stable group” of the faithful request it. But Cardinal Castrillon said that a stable group could consist of as few as three people, and they need not come from the same parish.

The changes will take a few years to implement fully, he added, just as the Second Vatican Council had taken a long time to absorb. He insisted that the widespread reintroduction of the old Mass did not contradict the teachings of the Council.